Tag Archives: Open Source

Too long without programming

I love programming! And because I do it less and less at work, I felt the need to do something about it.

I was looking for a project to help when I read the news about the new Raspberry Pi. And it took me only a couple of days to realise that was it, so I ordered it online and just received it. Raspberry Pi 2 Model BA beautiful little device with enough connectivity and power to have some fun!

I did not have much time yet to play with it, I was able to install Raspbian on it and that’s it. But I’m quite happy about my decision and I’m looking forward for the projects I plan with it (I’m hesitating between creating a weather station together with a small Arduino board as the “sensor”, or perhaps starting with something less ambitious maybe related to home automation).

Click more to see the system information (OS name, memory and CPU information) of that little wonder.

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Ubuntu Server remote administration – Ajenti

Ajenti LogoToday, I will present Ajenti, a remote administration tool for Linux and FreeBSD.

This article is part of a series about remote administration of Linux-based server (actually some of the tool work on *BSD systems too). You can find all article pertaining to this series using the Tag remote-server-admin.

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Ubuntu Server remote administration – Munin

Munin LogoToday, I will present Munin, a tool to monitor various health measurement of a system (essentially resources).

This article is part of a series about remote administration of Linux-based server (actually some of the tool work on *BSD systems too). You can find all article pertaining to this series using the Tag remote-server-admin.

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Ubuntu Server remote administration – Monit

Monit logoI have recently tested some remote administration tools for Ubuntu server (or any other Linux-based server). I have recorded here my findings and installation steps.

Today I present Monit, a monitoring and control tool for Unix and Unix-like systems.

This article will be followed by others with different tools. Stay tune, and you can find them all using the following tag remote-server-admin.

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Making Chrome flashy on Ubuntu

Giving Chrome its wings

Giving Chrome its wings

After making the chromes shine on Ubuntu, let’s make them flashy! In the previous article you learned how to have Google Chrome and Chromium installed, now that you have used them for awhile, you perhaps find out that you cannot play video on youtube.com or dailymotion.com, that you do not have annoying advertisement, etc. Yes, Google Chrome and Chromium Linux versions do not yet support Adobe Flash!

However, since you are not afraid to try a test version of these browsers on your favorite OS, you will not mind activating a test feature: plug-ins.

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Making Chrome shine on Ubuntu

Chromium

Chromium

Google Chrome is an internet browser (or navigator) based on the free software project Chromium. Chrome is long available on Windows, but only really recently is it available on Mac OS X and Linux, though still under “beta” (meaning testing/experimental) stage.

I have been using Chrome or Chromium without any obvious differences (at least on Linux).

So why Chrome/Chromium when there is already Firefox? First it is a matter of choice, I could answer you why so many different vehicles? Second, I like the look and feel of Chrome, it optimises the use of screen real estate, it is not cluttered with many menus or actions on the toolbar and it seems to always know where I want a new tab to be opened. Third, it launches really fast.

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Déjà Dup, an easy backup tool! Déjà vu?

Déjà Dup

Déjà Dup

Déjà Dup is a Gnome-based backup tool that aim for easiness. It provides transparent encryption of your data, can store to an external hard disk or a remote storage (SSH server or Amazon S3) and offers schedule backup.

The tool is extremely simple to use. It offers two big buttons, one for manual backup and one for restoring. Those two functions are accessible in the menu too, as well as preferences and help. That is all.

So how does it work?
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Commercial virtualisation product available for Ubuntu

A bit more than a month ago Spring just started, but it is so hot and sunny now that it feels already like Summer. Summer means much more outside activities and fewer inside topics: less blogging and less playing with Ubuntu.

Anyway from time to time, I still find opportunities to discover a new side of Ubuntu and to write about it. Today is about a recent update in the Ubuntu repositories that enabled the first commercial package: VMware Server.

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100% free laptop

Hold on, I did not mean that I was selling my laptop for free. I am not selling it at all and I am more than happy with it as it is 100% free (libre) when I am using Ubuntu. There is no proprietary driver used even for 3D or Wi-Fi.
Ubuntu Feisty Fawn offers a new tool about restricted drivers in the administration section which deals with restricted drivers.
I was curious about its functionalities and I launched it.
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