Monthly Archives: August 2015

An Unpredictable Raspberry Pi

Critical Miss! by Scott Ogle, CC BY-SA 2.0

Random Number Generator – Photo by Scott Ogle, CC BY-SA 2.0

Our computers are not really good at providing random numbers because they are quite deterministic (unless you count these pesky random bugs that make working on a computer so “enjoyable”). So we created different ways to generate pseudo-random numbers of various qualities depending on the use. For cryptography, it is paramount to have excellent random numbers, or an attacker could predict our next move!

Getting unpredictable is a difficult task, Linux tries to provide it by collecting environmental noise (e.g. disk seek time, mouse movement, etc.) in a first entropy pool which feeds a first Cryptographically Secure Pseudo-Random Number Generator (CSPRNG) which then output “sanitised” random numbers to different pools, one for each of the kernel output random device: /dev/random and /dev/urandom.

Raspberry Pi Logo (a Raspberry)

Our goal is to help our Raspberry Pi to have more entropy, so we will provide it with a new entropy collector based on its on-board hardware random number generator (HW RNG).

I have already presented quickly why you need entropy (and good one), and also a quick way of having more source for the Linux kernel entropy pool for the Raspberry Pi using Raspbian “Wheezy” or for any computer having a TPM chip on board.

This article is an update for all of you who upgraded their Raspbian to Jessie (Debian 8). The new system uses SystemD for the init process rather than Upstart for previous release.

The Raspberry Pi has an integrated hardware random number generator (HW RNG) which Linux can use to feed its entropy pool. The implication of using such HW RNG is debatable and I will discuss it in a coming article. But here is how to activate it.

It is still possible to load the kernel module using $ sudo modprobe bcm2708-rng. But I know recommend using the Raspberry Pi boot configuration, as it is more future proof: if there is a newer module for the BCM2709 in the Raspberry Pi 2 (or any newer model), using Raspberry Pi Device Tree (DT) overlays should always work. DT are a mean to set-up your Raspberry Pi for certain tasks by selecting automatically the right modules (or drivers) to load. It is possible to activate the HW RNG using this methods.
Actually, we do not need to load any DT overlays, but only to set the random parameter to ‘on‘. You can achieve this by editing the file /boot/config.txt, find the line starting with ‘dtparam=(...)‘ or add a new one starting with it. The value of dtparam is a comma separated list of parameters and value (e.g random=on,audio=on), see part 3 of the Raspberry Pi documentation for further info. So at least, you should have:

dtparam=random=on

With this method, you have to reboot so that the bootloader can pick-up automatically the right module for you.

Now install the rng-tools (the service should be automatically activated and started, default configuration is fine, but you can tweak/amend it in /etc/default/rng-tools), and set it to be enable at next boot:

$ sudo apt-get install rng-tools
$ sudo systemctl enable rng-tools

After awhile you can check the level of entropy in your pool and some stats on the rng-tools service:

$ echo $(cat /proc/sys/kernel/random/entropy_avail)/$(cat /proc/sys/kernel/random/poolsize)                                 
1925/4096
$ sudo pkill -USR1 rngd; sudo systemctl -n 15 status rng-tools
rngd[7231]: stats: bits received from HRNG source: 100064
rngd[7231]: stats: bits sent to kernel pool: 40512
rngd[7231]: stats: entropy added to kernel pool: 40512
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2 successes: 5
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2 failures: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Monobit: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Poker: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Runs: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Long run: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Continuous run: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: HRNG source speed: (min=824.382; avg=1022.108; max=1126.435)Kibits/s
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS tests speed: (min=6.459; avg=8.161; max=9.872)Mibits/s
rngd[7231]: stats: Lowest ready-buffers level: 2
rngd[7231]: stats: Entropy starvations: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: Time spent starving for entropy: (min=0; avg=0.000; max=0)us

Source:

Raspberry Pi is a trademark of the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

24 – Happy Birthday Linux

I was too young to have witness this and I had never heard of the internet, e-mails or usenet at that time. But it’s amasing to look once back and see how much technology and connectivity is so much more accessible, and that this simple hobby which was Linux at that time is now everywhere, even in space!

Hello everybody out there using minix –
I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones. This has been brewing since april, and is starting to get ready. I’d like any feedback on things people like/dislike in minix, as my OS resembles it somewhat (same physical layout of the file-system (due to practical reasons) among other things).
(…)
PS. Yes – it’s free of any minix code, and it has a multi-threaded fs. It is NOT portable (uses 386 task switching etc), and it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks, as that’s all I have :-(.
—Linus Torvalds

Installing Raspbian Headless (no screen, full network)

I’m going to explain how to install Raspbian (latest is based on Debian Wheezy, dated 2015-05) on a Raspberry Pi which is only connected to the network using a Ethernet cable (of course your Raspberry Pi should be connected to a power source).

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B+ v1.1This guide should work for all Raspberry Pi supported version with an Ethernet interface (B, B+ and 2). It could potentially work without an Ethernet interface if you have a WiFi USB dongle which is supported out-of-the box by the RPi. I’ve tested the following on a Raspberry Pi 2. This guide assumes that you are doing all steps from a Unix machine (I’ve done them from Fedora Linux but it should work on any Linux, BSD or OS X with potential adaptation). It is possible to do it on Windows I suppose, but I don’t have Windows and can’t explain.

The steps are:

  • Flash the Raspbian image to a SD card;
  • Sync everything and mount the second partition created;
  • Modify files on the SD card to allow SSH (and optionally configure WiFi);
  • Put the SD card in your RPi and plug the power;
  • Wait a couple of minute for thing to settle;
  • Either check your DHCP server (e.g. your router) for the RPi IP address, or scan your network);
  • Connect to your RPi using SSH and finish the setup;
  • (option) Upgrade to Debian Jessie (you will have to view the full article)!

Flash the Raspbian image to a SD card

Raspbian LogoThere are already numerous guides online on how to do that. So I will be brief, but refer to those guides for your exact configuration. I assume a new SD card which has already a Windows FAT partition with a size bigger than 4GB (I recommend 16GB). When I plugged that SD card on my laptop it was recognised as /dev/mmcblk0p1 and automatically mounted. First we need to unmount this partition and then to remember the device name (without the partition suffix, so /dev/mmcblk0 in my case). Note that if you are on BSD or OS X those steps are slightly different, check online. Using the device name we can flash the Raspbian image (after downloading the zip file, check that the SHA-1 checksum match).

$ sudo umount /dev/mmcblk0p1
$ unzip -c 2015-05-05-raspbian-wheezy.img.zip | sudo dd bs=1M of=/dev/mmcblk0
$ sudo sync; sleep 4; sudo sync

After doing the above you should have now 2 new partitions on your SD card. The first partition (suffix p1) is the boot one and is formatted as FAT (was <60MB for me). The second one (suffixed p2) is the root partition and is formatted as ext4 (roughly 3GB). That’s the partition /dev/mmcblk0p2 which is interested for the next step.

Allow SSH access

OpenSSH LogoYou need to mount the second partition now, So create first a mount point and then mount the partition to it.

$ sudo mkdir /mnt/rpi
$ sudo mount /dev/mmcblk0p2 /mnt/rpi
$ cd /mnt/rpi/etc
$ sudo mv rc2.d/K01ssh rc2.d/S01ssh
$ sudo mv rc3.d/K01ssh rc3.d/S01ssh
$ sudo mv rc4.d/K01ssh rc4.d/S01ssh
$ sudo mv rc5.d/K01ssh rc5.d/S01ssh

That’s it!

Network Wireless by OxygenOptional: if you do not have an Ethernet interface and need to use WiFi, you need to add the WiFi configuration (your SSID – or WiFi network name – and your WiFi password). Assuming you have something like WPA2-PSK, you simply need to edit the file /mnt/rpi/etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf and add the following at the end of the file:

network={
    ssid="Your_WiFi_SSID"
    psk="Your_WiFi_password"
}

The network configuration on Raspbian is set to use DHCP, so after booting the system will use whatever network interface it has available and make DHCP requests in order to get an IP address.

Note: please don’t use both the Ethernet and WiFi interfaces if you they are both on the same network. Such a configuration is possible, but it won’t work out-of-the-box. So set up first one interface, make it work and then add the other one (look for online resources about how to configure Linux for 2 NIC on the same subnets).

Now sync all changes to the SD card:

$ cd ~ ; sudo umount /mnt/rpi

Start Raspbian and connect to it

Before removing the SD card from your computer, be sure that you properly unmounted it (check last steps of previous chapter).

Now remove the SD card from the computer, insert it in the Raspberry Pi, plug the Ethernet cable (or the WiFi USB dongle) and then the USB power plug. The LEDs of your RPi should light up (PWR – red one – means that your power supply is good enough; ACT – green one – should not be steady green, it means your SD card is not readable or was wrongly flashed, it should blink). After the RPi has completed boot up, the ACT LED should be off (mostly), meaning that there are no more I/O activities going on. That’s when you can be sure that the RPi has sent its DHCP probes and should have an IP address assigned.

To know your Raspberry Pi IP address, you can either go to your DHCP server (e.g. your router) and check which addess was assigned to it, or simply scan your network. To scan your network you need to know your subnet (e.g. 192.168.1.0 with a netmask of 255.255.255.0) and have nmap installed on your computer (sudo dnf install nmap will work for Fedora, and it is as easy for Debian/Ubuntu-based distros as well, just replace dnf by apt-get).

$ sudo nmap -sP 192.168.1.0/24

Of course you need to adapt the above command to your subnet. The “/24” part is the netmask equivalent of 255.255.255.0. I recommend running the above command with sudo because it will display the MAC address of all the discovered devices which will help you spot your Raspberry Pi as nmap is displaying the vendor attached to each MAC address. See for yourself in the example output:

Starting Nmap 6.47 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2015-07-19 20:12 CEST
(...)
Nmap scan report for raspberrypi.lan (192.168.1.9)
Host is up (0.0060s latency).
MAC Address: B8:27:EB:1E:42:18 (Raspberry Pi Foundation)
(...)
Nmap done: 256 IP addresses (8 hosts up) scanned in 2.05 seconds

Now you can simply connect to your RPi by using the user pi and password raspberrypi (which are default on Raspbian):

$ ssh pi@192.168.1.9
The authenticity of host 'raspberrypi (192.168.1.9)' can't be established.
ECDSA key fingerprint is SHA256:WSF9Rpmh0Mr/JYUye8r69nXzwZtYbdH0xJ5M4AFYxYY.
Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
Warning: Permanently added 'raspberrypi,192.168.1.9' (ECDSA) to the list of known hosts.
pi@raspberrypi's password: 
Linux raspberrypi 3.18.11-v7+ #781 SMP PREEMPT Tue Apr 21 18:07:59 BST 2015 armv7l

The programs included with the Debian GNU/Linux system are free software;
the exact distribution terms for each program are described in the
individual files in /usr/share/doc/*/copyright.

Debian GNU/Linux comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY, to the extent
permitted by applicable law.

NOTICE: the software on this Raspberry Pi has not been fully configured. Please run 'sudo raspi-config'

pi@raspberrypi ~ $

As it is advised, you can run the command sudo raspi-config especially to increase the partition size so it uses the complete SD card space available.

That’s it, you have installed Raspbian on a Raspberry Pi without a screen or keyboard (headless). I strongly recommend to follow my advice about Raspberry Pi Raspbian post-installation and security.

Picture credits: The Debian Logo belongs to the Debian project. Raspberry Pi and its logo are trademarks of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The OpenSSH logo is copyrighted by OpenBSD. The wireless device is an icon from the Oxygen set of the KDE project provided under GNU LGPLv3.

 

Update: I forgot the icing on the cake: upgrading to Debian Jessie. Continue reading to learn a quick way to do it.

Continue reading

Linux 4.1 = +50% power efficiency (when idle)

Increased battery efficiency

Increased battery efficiency

On my laptop, I’m running Fedora 22 which was shipped initially with a Linux 4.0 kernel. It was difficult to get 4h of battery life (3h30 was usually enough to deplete the battery down to 5%). Recently, the kernel was changed to 4.1 and because after 5h working on my laptop I got notified that I still had 10% power I got curious,

Therefore with a fully charged battery, I booted with Fedora 22 Linux kernel 4.0.4-301. I used powertop to measure the battery power usage in Watt in graphical (ex-init 5 level) and multi-user target (ex-init 3 level). I then rebooted using Linux kernel 4.1.3-201 and did the same measurement. I waited each time that the system settled down and that successive measurements where constant. Nothing was running, WiFi was ON and connected (Link Quality=64/70), screen brightness at 30%, Graphical target is using Gnome 3.

SystemD Target (~init level) Linux 4.0 (in W) Linux 4.1 (in W) Progress
Multi-User (init 3) 12,8 8,66 -32%
Graphical (init 5) 13,1 8,51 -35%

Wow! That’s great. And the estimated battery power is now up from 4h to 6h30 with WiFi ON. But with light browsing usage and some Arduino development, I got a bit more than 5h15 without requiring a wall power connection!! That close to 50% more battery life than with earlier kernels.

Where does this come from? I don’t know. There seems to have been a few pull requests about power management for kernel 4,1 but none stroke me as relevant for such a huge improvement, Matthew Garrett has proposed a patch to improve dramatically the power efficiency of Intel’s Haswell and Broadwell CPUs (and I happen to have an Haswell one), so that could have been that patch, but I did not find it in the kernel 4.1 changelog, so I doubt it was yet implemented. So I really don’t know what made change in the kernel bring such an improvement. (note: I’m running Fedora 22 and without software update, just by selecting kernel 4.0 or 4.1 at boot, I can see the difference in power consumption. So this is really a kernel-side improvement).

Did you also witness improvement when switching to Linux kernel 4.1? Let me know using any social media means!

Note to self: telinit is now deprecated in favour of systemd targets. Runlevel 3 can be reached by invoking sudo systemctl isolate multi-user.target and the switch to the “runlevel 5” can be triggered using sudo systemctl isolate graphical.target.

Picture credits: Picture was created by me using elements from the KDE project. The original materials were licensed under GNU LGPLv3, and the picture is also provided under this license terms and conditions.

Internet of Things? Not as it is marketed

Prototype of an IoT project based on ArduinoAs I’m trying to prototype some sensors which I will then use around my home to monitor events and perhaps also react on them, I’ve been a bit more looking at the Internet of Things (aka IoT) trend. So here is my opinion on IoT in regards to personal home automation.

And to start franckly, I think the use of IoT for home automation is idiotic. It is my view that current companies in this field understood IoT as being online, in the cloud, whereas I thought it was about to be based on network standards (such as those used on the internet) for improved interoperability. Why is it needed to make it “internet” connected (collected)? It really does not need to be on the internet, IoT just needs the local network access and standard communication stack!

I think the monitoring elements, the storage of this data, the analysis and control systems, and the actuators should all be local, in house. If an actuator needs data from the Internet or in the end calling an internet service it’s still possible even if it stays local. There is absolutely no advantage to have all this in a “cloud”, this is only to the benefits of ad agency and other agencies which can use your data to better “monitor” you!

And having an IoT brings many challenges: data transmission, congestion, storage, latency, security, privacy, etc. some of those are mentioned in this article I found on Twitter today. But this article is also oriented towards other usage for IoT than in the house. (Note that if you’re used to build M&C – Monitoring and Control – systems, you will not be surprised by this article content, these are classical challenges in M&C domain).

From my perspective and when used within a house, my decentralized approach to IoT (without cloud or external internet services) is not subject (to the same extent) to most of the challenges presented in this article.

I also think that data retention for a house is really limited (e.g. only the latest status for a window/door open state sensor; maybe up to a week/month of data from a temperature sensor; etc.) so storage of data is not challenging.

Latency is also not such a problem. Only few actuators in a home would require immediate response (e.g. so called “smart lock”). For other sensors the reporting of new data could be cyclic (with long update cycles such as once every 15 minutes) or on change (with big thresholds) because latency is of such lower priority.

Raspberry Pi 2 box with Logo (a raspberry)I therefore think a device as simple as a Raspberry Pi 2 is perfectly suited to be the core element of a Home Automation system. It has enough processing power, storage capacity, interfaces capabilities to be the host of all the gathering of monitored data, their processing and analysis, and of all actuators. And it can easily use internet services (if need be) thanks to its network interface.

If one day I find the need to have access to my home automation system, it will be simply done from my mobile via VPN or router configuration.

As a conclusion you can find consolidated here my opinion regarding IoT and Home Automation:

  • On premise: the data should not leave the house, processing and controlling should be done at home;
  • No Cloud: this is the corollary to my previous point. The data belong to us and shall be kept private. Pushing them to the cloud add complexity, risks with no benefits;
  • Open standards: communication and interoperability are paramount for the success of IoT. Adding a new IoT device should be easy; and
  • Short data lifespan: no need to keep tracks of IoT data for long periods. Most of it is interesting only the moment it changes and then can be forgotten.

The Best Companion to my Raspberry Pi

I got recently a companion for my Raspberry Pi.

A photo of a Arduino Uno R3

An Arduino Uno R3 – The 1 € coin is given for size comparison.

My goal is to use it to prototype something I want to make: a small network of temperature and humidity sensors running for months on batteries.

Why? First because I can (I need to learn a lot first regarding electronic or microcontrollers, but I’m sure I can). Second because we have add a few problems with humidity in our basement and I want to be able to have a better idea when this is happening to find a proper solution. My idea would be to correlate the measurements to others done externally and which would include more environmental data (e.g. pressure and amount of rain) and if possible with some events (e.g. gutters are overflowing water).

I already started the prototyping based on a tutorial from Adafruit – a Wifi Weather Station. The results works well as one could expect. So I validated my first part: yes I can do some basic electronic and microcontroller programming, the Raspberry Pi is doing the web server side.

My Prototype Environmental Sensor (WiFi based) v0.1

My Prototype Environmental Sensor (WiFi based) v0.1

A Simple Monitoring Web App (from Adafruit tutorial)

A Simple Monitoring Web App (from Adafruit tutorial)

The next step is reprogramming the microcontroller to push data periodically using plain UDP and either a Graphite, Statsd or Fluentd syntax. This would be pushed to a multicast address which my Raspberry Pi would listen to, it would run the Graphite/Statsd/Fluentd stack (I’m going to start with Graphite alone and see how good it is). I want to keep historical data of at least one month, perhaps even a bit more and to be able to visualise the data in real time.

Once this is done, then I want to get rid of the WiFi module and use a transceiver in the 433 or 868 MHz band (I’m in Europe). The Raspberry Pi will be the gateway between this radio-protocol and the more standard computer network stack. So I would need to adapt whatever I had chosen for stack on my Raspberry Pi to be able to cope with the new type of input. Either I contribute to a project if it is well architectured, or I build a bridge interface.

Final step of the prototyping will be to go low power. I’ve already approximately calculated how long I could run on 2 AA rechargeable batteries with the latest Arduino prototype and my “guestimates” is that it won’t last more than a week (probably less). So far from ideal. The solution is to build your own “Arduino”, meaning taking the microcontroller only (plus a few required components for it to run) and the needed components for the sensor. It seems that the power draw from the battery in this case would be sub mA. So I should be able to run many months on a 2 AA batteries :-)