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Installing Ubuntu Server on Raspberry Pi – Headless

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B+ v1.1This article will describes the steps to install Ubuntu Server 16.04 on a Raspberry Pi 2. This article provides extra steps so that no screen or keyboard are required on the Raspberry Pi, it will be headless. But of course you need a screen and keyboard on the computer on which you will download the image and write it to the MicroSD card. It is similar to a previous article about installing Debian on Raspberry Pi 2, also headless mode.

Disclaimer: you need to know a minimum about computer, operating system, Linux and Raspberry Pi. If you just want to install an Operating System on your Raspberry Pi, get NOOBS the Raspberry Pi Foundation installer. This guide is for more advanced users. If you follow this guide but do mistakes, you might wipe out disk content or could even brick Micro SD card or what not.

Install the Ubuntu Server image

Ubuntu Circle of Friend LogoGrab your official Ubuntu Server for Raspberry Pi 2 image (the latest version at time of writing is ubuntu-16.04.1-preinstalled-server-armhf+raspi2.img.xz but in a few days the image for Ubuntu 16.04.2 should be available, it will save you some time when upgrading it (and save some write cycles on your Micro SD card). Once downloaded, you need to insert the Micro SD card on your computer (you probably need a USB card reader for that) and try to figure out which device it corresponds to, see the Ubuntu documentation for further guidance. I assume you know what you do but be weary that the next command if done on the wrong device could wipe out the data on that device. I do not take any responsibility if things go wrong.

$ xzcat ubuntu-16.04.1-preinstalled-server-armhf+raspi2.img.xz | dd of=<device> bs=32M

Create a user account and allow SSH access

Then make sure to sync your media data and then mount the newly created partition (normally there are 2 partitions created, we are interested in the second one, it should be named <device>p2 or <device>2:

$ sudo sync
$ sudo mkdir -p /mnt/rpi
$ sudo mount <device>2 /mnt/rpi

User account creation

As the Raspberry Pi uses an ARM processor and the computer on which I created the Micro SD card is a x86_64 processor, I cannot simply chroot and execute adduser in the newly mounted partition. The programs are compiled for a different architecture. So to add a new user we will need to do it manually by editing system files. We will create a new user and group, then add the corresponding entries in the files where the passwords are kept.

Add a new user (replace $(whoami) by your username if you want a different username than your current one).

$ echo "$(whoami):x:1000:1000:<Full Name>:/home/$(whoami):/bin/bash" | sudo tee -a /mnt/rpi/etc/passwd

Now create your group by editing /mnt/rpi/etc/group:

$ echo "$(whoami):x:1000:"" | sudo tee -a /mnt/rpi/etc/group

Now edit the group password database:

$ echo "$(whoami):*::$(whoami)" | sudo tee -a /mnt/rpi/etc/gshadow

And the user passsword database (it will have no default password but allow SSH key base authentication over the network and it will request to set a password upon first login. Note that with this configuration remote SSH login cannot happen without the SSH key, so it is a secure configuration):

$ echo "$(whoami)::0:0:99999:7:::" | sudo tee -a /mnt/rpi/etc/shadow

Grant your user access to administrative tasks (via sudo), but still requires that the user enter his own password:

$ echo "$(whoami) ALL=(ALL) ALL" | sudo tee /mnt/rpi/etc/sudoers.d/20_$(whoami)_superuser

User home folder and SSH access

Now we shall create the user’s home and add the SSH public key so we can login (it is assumed that you have a public RSA key under your home directory named ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub change the name if it’s different):

$ sudo cp -R /mnt/rpi/etc/skel /mnt/rpi/home/$(whoami)
$ sudo chmod 0750 /mnt/rpi/home/$(whoami)
$ sudo mkdir -m 0700 /mnt/rpi/home/$(whoami)/.ssh
$ cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | sudo tee -a /mnt/rpi/home/$(whoami)/.ssh/authorized_keys
$ sudo chmod 0600 /mnt/rpi/home/$(whoami)/.ssh/authorized_keys
$ sudo chown -R 1000:1000 /mnt/rpi/home/$(whoami)

Setup Systemd for enabling SSH access and headless mode

Normally everything else should be correctly setup. However you might want to have a look at systemd configuration, mostly of interests are which default target is in use (for headless you want multi-user.target) and if the SSH service is part of the default target. What I did was the following (it also avoid creating the ubuntu user):

$ cd /mnt/rpi/lib/systemd/system
$ rm -f default.target
$ ln -s multi-user.target default.target
$ cd /mnt/rpi/etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants
$ ln -s /lib/systemd/system/ssh.service ssh.service

(if the last command fails because the file already exist then it is all OK)

Start Ubuntu Server on Raspberry Pi

Now unmount the card and eject it: sudo umount /mnt/rpi. You can now safely insert the card in your Raspberry Pi 2 and boot it. It boots slower than with Raspbian, so be patient. Note that with all the above configuration, you do not need to boot with a keyboard or screen attached to your Raspberry Pi. Only an Ethernet cable and the power plug are necessary.

Now you need to find your newly installed Ubuntu Server on your network, the default hostname is ubuntu so you could always start with that (ssh $(whoami)@ubuntu) if it is not in conflict with another device of yours and if your router is clever enough to have updated the DNS resolver. Or else you need to scan your network for it. To scan your network you need to know your subnet (e.g. 192.168.1.0 with a netmask of 255.255.255.0) and have nmap installed on your computer (sudo dnf install nmap will work for Fedora, and it is as easy for Debian/Ubuntu-based distros as well, just replace sudo apt-get install nmap).

$ sudo nmap -sP 192.168.1.0/24

Of course you need to adapt the above command to your subnet. The “/24” part is the netmask equivalent of 255.255.255.0. I recommend running the above command with sudo because it will display the MAC address of all the discovered devices which will help you spot your Raspberry Pi as nmap is displaying the vendor attached to each MAC address. See for yourself in the example output:

Starting Nmap 6.47 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2015-07-19 20:12 CEST
(...)
Nmap scan report for ubuntu.lan (192.168.1.9)
Host is up (0.0060s latency).
MAC Address: B8:27:EB:1E:42:18 (Raspberry Pi Foundation)
(...)
Nmap done: 256 IP addresses (8 hosts up) scanned in 2.05 seconds

Now you can simply connect to your RPi using SSH:

ssh $(whoami)@192.168.1.9
Enter passphrase for key '~/.ssh/id_rsa':
You are required to change your password immediately (root enforced)
Welcome to Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (GNU/Linux 4.4.0-1017-raspi2 armv7l)

(...)

142 packages can be updated.
69 updates are security updates.

(...)

WARNING: Your password has expired.
You must change your password now and login again!
(current) UNIX password:

Now that you are authenticated and have access to your newly installed Ubuntu Server, it is time to upgrade it.

Upgrade Ubuntu Server to latest packages

The tool tmux should already be installed on your system (or do sudo apt install tmux), so use it to create a new session, so even if you get a network problem your session is not killed (simply do tmux attach)

$ tmux
$ sudo apt dist-upgrade
$ sudo systemctl reboot

Note: it is possible that unattended-upgrade kicks in before you can do the upgrade manually. Then wait an hour or more (depending on the speed of your internet connection and Micro SD card mainly) before doing the above steps. It is still worth while as the dist-upgrade command will perform more thorough upgrade (potentially removing deprecated packages or even downgrading some if necessary) but you will be in sync with the latest and greatest Ubuntu Server.

Picture credits: Photo of a Raspberry Pi board by me, see the website licensing policy. Ubuntu Circle of Friends logo is copyright by Canonical.

Installing Raspbian Headless (no screen, full network)

I’m going to explain how to install Raspbian (latest is based on Debian Wheezy, dated 2015-05) on a Raspberry Pi which is only connected to the network using a Ethernet cable (of course your Raspberry Pi should be connected to a power source).

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B+ v1.1This guide should work for all Raspberry Pi supported version with an Ethernet interface (B, B+ and 2). It could potentially work without an Ethernet interface if you have a WiFi USB dongle which is supported out-of-the box by the RPi. I’ve tested the following on a Raspberry Pi 2. This guide assumes that you are doing all steps from a Unix machine (I’ve done them from Fedora Linux but it should work on any Linux, BSD or OS X with potential adaptation). It is possible to do it on Windows I suppose, but I don’t have Windows and can’t explain.

The steps are:

  • Flash the Raspbian image to a SD card;
  • Sync everything and mount the second partition created;
  • Modify files on the SD card to allow SSH (and optionally configure WiFi);
  • Put the SD card in your RPi and plug the power;
  • Wait a couple of minute for thing to settle;
  • Either check your DHCP server (e.g. your router) for the RPi IP address, or scan your network);
  • Connect to your RPi using SSH and finish the setup;
  • (option) Upgrade to Debian Jessie (you will have to view the full article)!

Flash the Raspbian image to a SD card

Raspbian LogoThere are already numerous guides online on how to do that. So I will be brief, but refer to those guides for your exact configuration. I assume a new SD card which has already a Windows FAT partition with a size bigger than 4GB (I recommend 16GB). When I plugged that SD card on my laptop it was recognised as /dev/mmcblk0p1 and automatically mounted. First we need to unmount this partition and then to remember the device name (without the partition suffix, so /dev/mmcblk0 in my case). Note that if you are on BSD or OS X those steps are slightly different, check online. Using the device name we can flash the Raspbian image (after downloading the zip file, check that the SHA-1 checksum match).

$ sudo umount /dev/mmcblk0p1
$ unzip -c 2015-05-05-raspbian-wheezy.img.zip | sudo dd bs=1M of=/dev/mmcblk0
$ sudo sync; sleep 4; sudo sync

After doing the above you should have now 2 new partitions on your SD card. The first partition (suffix p1) is the boot one and is formatted as FAT (was <60MB for me). The second one (suffixed p2) is the root partition and is formatted as ext4 (roughly 3GB). That’s the partition /dev/mmcblk0p2 which is interested for the next step.

Allow SSH access

OpenSSH LogoYou need to mount the second partition now, So create first a mount point and then mount the partition to it.

$ sudo mkdir /mnt/rpi
$ sudo mount /dev/mmcblk0p2 /mnt/rpi
$ cd /mnt/rpi/etc
$ sudo mv rc2.d/K01ssh rc2.d/S01ssh
$ sudo mv rc3.d/K01ssh rc3.d/S01ssh
$ sudo mv rc4.d/K01ssh rc4.d/S01ssh
$ sudo mv rc5.d/K01ssh rc5.d/S01ssh

That’s it!

Network Wireless by OxygenOptional: if you do not have an Ethernet interface and need to use WiFi, you need to add the WiFi configuration (your SSID – or WiFi network name – and your WiFi password). Assuming you have something like WPA2-PSK, you simply need to edit the file /mnt/rpi/etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf and add the following at the end of the file:

network={
    ssid="Your_WiFi_SSID"
    psk="Your_WiFi_password"
}

The network configuration on Raspbian is set to use DHCP, so after booting the system will use whatever network interface it has available and make DHCP requests in order to get an IP address.

Note: please don’t use both the Ethernet and WiFi interfaces if you they are both on the same network. Such a configuration is possible, but it won’t work out-of-the-box. So set up first one interface, make it work and then add the other one (look for online resources about how to configure Linux for 2 NIC on the same subnets).

Now sync all changes to the SD card:

$ cd ~ ; sudo umount /mnt/rpi

Start Raspbian and connect to it

Before removing the SD card from your computer, be sure that you properly unmounted it (check last steps of previous chapter).

Now remove the SD card from the computer, insert it in the Raspberry Pi, plug the Ethernet cable (or the WiFi USB dongle) and then the USB power plug. The LEDs of your RPi should light up (PWR – red one – means that your power supply is good enough; ACT – green one – should not be steady green, it means your SD card is not readable or was wrongly flashed, it should blink). After the RPi has completed boot up, the ACT LED should be off (mostly), meaning that there are no more I/O activities going on. That’s when you can be sure that the RPi has sent its DHCP probes and should have an IP address assigned.

To know your Raspberry Pi IP address, you can either go to your DHCP server (e.g. your router) and check which addess was assigned to it, or simply scan your network. To scan your network you need to know your subnet (e.g. 192.168.1.0 with a netmask of 255.255.255.0) and have nmap installed on your computer (sudo dnf install nmap will work for Fedora, and it is as easy for Debian/Ubuntu-based distros as well, just replace dnf by apt-get).

$ sudo nmap -sP 192.168.1.0/24

Of course you need to adapt the above command to your subnet. The “/24” part is the netmask equivalent of 255.255.255.0. I recommend running the above command with sudo because it will display the MAC address of all the discovered devices which will help you spot your Raspberry Pi as nmap is displaying the vendor attached to each MAC address. See for yourself in the example output:

Starting Nmap 6.47 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2015-07-19 20:12 CEST
(...)
Nmap scan report for raspberrypi.lan (192.168.1.9)
Host is up (0.0060s latency).
MAC Address: B8:27:EB:1E:42:18 (Raspberry Pi Foundation)
(...)
Nmap done: 256 IP addresses (8 hosts up) scanned in 2.05 seconds

Now you can simply connect to your RPi by using the user pi and password raspberrypi (which are default on Raspbian):

$ ssh pi@192.168.1.9
The authenticity of host 'raspberrypi (192.168.1.9)' can't be established.
ECDSA key fingerprint is SHA256:WSF9Rpmh0Mr/JYUye8r69nXzwZtYbdH0xJ5M4AFYxYY.
Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
Warning: Permanently added 'raspberrypi,192.168.1.9' (ECDSA) to the list of known hosts.
pi@raspberrypi's password: 
Linux raspberrypi 3.18.11-v7+ #781 SMP PREEMPT Tue Apr 21 18:07:59 BST 2015 armv7l

The programs included with the Debian GNU/Linux system are free software;
the exact distribution terms for each program are described in the
individual files in /usr/share/doc/*/copyright.

Debian GNU/Linux comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY, to the extent
permitted by applicable law.

NOTICE: the software on this Raspberry Pi has not been fully configured. Please run 'sudo raspi-config'

pi@raspberrypi ~ $

As it is advised, you can run the command sudo raspi-config especially to increase the partition size so it uses the complete SD card space available.

That’s it, you have installed Raspbian on a Raspberry Pi without a screen or keyboard (headless). I strongly recommend to follow my advice about Raspberry Pi Raspbian post-installation and security.

Picture credits: The Debian Logo belongs to the Debian project. Raspberry Pi and its logo are trademarks of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The OpenSSH logo is copyrighted by OpenBSD. The wireless device is an icon from the Oxygen set of the KDE project provided under GNU LGPLv3.

 

Update: I forgot the icing on the cake: upgrading to Debian Jessie. Continue reading to learn a quick way to do it.

Continue reading

Installing Linux on Raspberry Pi – The Easy Way

As I announced, I got a Raspberry Pi 2 Model B and although I did not get much time to play yet with it, it was just an excuse to get back to programming and a little computer science fun.

Anyway, I’ve installed Raspbian on it and did a few configurations which I think are worthy to share with others. I’m not going to describe a step-by-step to install a Linux distribution on your Pi, I recommend trying NOOBS and check the good documentation from the Raspberry Pi Foundation. With this setup you can choose during the installation process which Linux distribution to install.

That’s what I did as a warm-up and a quick way to get an up-and-running Pi.

Note that the Raspberry Pi 2 has a new CPU (ARMv7) which is not yet fully exploited by most distribution targeted at the Raspberry Pi ecosystem (with the exception of the Linux kernel). There is one exception: Snappy Ubuntu Core but it is yet alpha. However it should be possible to install most standard Linux distribution that are supporting ARMv7 instructions set, however this is an interesting exercise which I did not perform (yet).

Anyway, using the NOOBS installation or any of the images provided for SD Card has several implication in terms of security. Here is what I recommend to do after the first boot.

Changing password and locking root

If you use the Raspbian installation, then you have one user account `pi’. If you haven’t changed the password for this user during installation, then better do it now. Once connected as `pi’ do:

$ passwd

And enter and then confirm the password you want to use.

With Raspbian, the `pi’ user has administrator’s rights. You can call sudo to perform system changes. If you are comfortable with that, then simply lock the root account:

$ sudo passwd -dl root

Or if you simply want to give a password of your own and use root:

$ sudo passwd root

Getting some Entropy

I am preparing a more detail article on this topic, so for now I am only going to give some background and the commands to increase the sources of entropy. Entropy is important, you need sufficient entropy (which your Linux kernel can gather for you) to be able to generate good pseudo-random numbers. Those numbers are used by many cryptographic services, such as generating SSH keys or SSL/TLS certificates.

The problem with embedded devices such as the Raspberry Pi (especially if you run it headless like I do) is that there aren’t many sources of entropy available to the kernel, especially at boot time.

The Raspberry Pi has an integrated hardware random number generator (HW RNG) which Linux can use to feed its entropy pool. The implication of using such HW RNG is debatable and I will discuss it in the coming article. But here is how to activate it.

First of all, load the kernel module (aka driver) for the HW RNG (the Raspberry Pi 2 can use the same kernel module as the Raspberry Pi 1 models). The Linux way of doing it is via modprobe:

$ sudo modprobe bcm2708-rng

If it worked a new device should be now available /dev/hwrng and the following should be visible in the system messages:

$ dmesg | tail -1
[ 133.787336] bcm2708_rng_init=bbafe000

To make the change permanent, on any Linux system you simply load the module in the /etc/modules file by adding a new line with bcm2708_rng (see next command). Or you can use the Raspberry Pi firmware Device Tree (DT) overlays (see below).

$ sudo bash -c 'echo bcm2708_rng >> /etc/modules'

Now install the rng-tools (the service should be automatically activated and started, default configuration is fine, but you can tweak/amend it in /etc/default/rng-tools)

$ sudo apt-get install rng-tools

After awhile you can check the level of entropy in your pool and some stats on the rng-tools service:

$ echo $(cat /proc/sys/kernel/random/entropy_avail)/$(cat /proc/sys/kernel/random/poolsize)                                 
1925/4096
$ sudo pkill -USR1 rngd; tail -15 /var/log/syslog
rngd[7231]: stats: bits received from HRNG source: 100064
rngd[7231]: stats: bits sent to kernel pool: 40512
rngd[7231]: stats: entropy added to kernel pool: 40512
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2 successes: 5
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2 failures: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Monobit: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Poker: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Runs: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Long run: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Continuous run: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: HRNG source speed: (min=824.382; avg=1022.108; max=1126.435)Kibits/s
rngd[7231]: stats: FIPS tests speed: (min=6.459; avg=8.161; max=9.872)Mibits/s
rngd[7231]: stats: Lowest ready-buffers level: 2
rngd[7231]: stats: Entropy starvations: 0
rngd[7231]: stats: Time spent starving for entropy: (min=0; avg=0.000; max=0)us

Securing SSH – the basic

I run my Pi headless for the moment. So after the first boot, I went into the advanced configuration of the raspi-config and activated SSH daemon. I’m not here going to describe how to properly secure the SSHd daemon, which can be a topic for a future article. I’m only going to focus on one topic which is SSH host keys.

SSH host keys are the means for a user connecting to a remote server to verify the authenticity of the server. That the sort of message you see the first time you connect to an SSH server:

$ ssh pi@raspberrypi
The authenticity of host 'raspberrypi (192.168.1.52)' can't be established.
ECDSA key fingerprint is 42:3d:4f:b7:0b:4b:62:11:47:28:cc:86:76:0c:ac:24.
Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)?

If an attacker tries to spoof your SSH server, on connection you will get this message:

$ ssh pi@raspberrypi
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@    WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!     @
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SOMEONE IS DOING SOMETHING NASTY!
Someone could be eavesdropping on you right now (man-in-the-middle attack)!
It is also possible that a host key has just been changed.
The fingerprint for the ECDSA key sent by the remote host is
42:3d:4f:b7:0b:4b:62:11:47:28:cc:86:76:0c:ac:24.
Please contact your system administrator.
Add correct host key in /home/pithagore/.ssh/known_hosts to get rid of this message.
Offending ECDSA key in /home/pithagore/.ssh/known_hosts:3
  remove with: ssh-keygen -f "/home/pithagore/.ssh/known_hosts" -R raspberrypi
ECDSA host key for raspberrypi has changed and you have requested strict checking.
Host key verification failed.

So this is all good, but the problem with these host keys is that you cannot really trust the one installed by default. They could be the same as the one from the image you downloaded and flashed on your SD Card, and so would be similar to all other persons installing the same image. Another problem is that they could have been generated at a point in the installation where not enough entropy was gathered by the kernel to be able to provide non-predictable random numbers. Therefore someone could use this to generate new host keys that would match the one on your Raspberry Pi.

Now that in the earlier chapter we added good source to feed the entropy pool, we can regenerate better host keys. First get rid off the previous ones:

$ sudo rm /etc/ssh/ssh_host_*key{,.pub}

Then generate new ones with one of the 3 possibilities:

  • Automatic configuration using dpkg
$ sudo dpkg-reconfigure openssh-server 
Creating SSH2 RSA key; this may take some time ...
Creating SSH2 ECDSA key; this may take some time ...
Restarting OpenBSD Secure Shell server: sshd.
  • Automatic configuration using ssh-keygen
$ sudo ssh-keygen -A
$ sudo service ssh restart
  • Manual configuration
$ sudo ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096 -N "" -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key
$ sudo ssh-keygen -t ecdsa -b 521 -N "" -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_ecdsa_key
$ sudo service ssh restart

Now if you want to print the fingerprint of any of your host keys to make sure of the authenticity of the server you are connecting to (should only be needed the first time your client connects to your server):

$ ssh-keygen -l -f

 

Gnome 3 on Ubuntu LTS

This mini how-to is to install Gnome on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Of course the best approach would have been to install Ubuntu Gnome in the first place. But if you didn’t (like me) and have Unity as desktop and would like Gnome (or just give it a try), check the rest of this article.

Note and disclaimer: Gnome3 will be available alongside Unity. So you can always switch back and forth between the two without troubles. However, a word of caution, as usual with system modifications, make sure you have backups available and working before proceeding. I make no guarantee that the following will work for you. I’m only stated it worked for me.

Installing Gnome Shell (aka Gnome3)

Installing the “core” Gnome 3 is rather easy. You need to have the Universe repository activated and then:

$ sudo apt update; sudo apt upgrade
$ sudo apt install gnome-shell

During installation of gnome-shell, you will be prompted to choose between GDM (the default Gnome Display Manager) and LightDM (an alternative Ubuntu is using by default). The main functions of these DM, from an end user perspective, is that they provide a graphical login where you can choose the user (and type a password) and choose the desktop environment to use once logged in. In addition these DM can offer things such as autologin. There is no wrong answer here. You can stick with LightDM (it is the one installed by default on UBuntu, and that’s the option I chose) or switch to GDM. In both cases, you need to choose for the session if you wish to use Gnome or Unity desktop environment.

Now you can log out and log in again (choosing Gnome for the session).

Installing some missing default Gnome Apps

This is entirely optional. If you have seen Gnome3 release notes, you will be looking for a few extra applications that are not installed by default by Ubuntu and that are available in the Universe repository. Example applications: Gnome Maps, Gnome Weather, etc.

To install them, you can either install the gnome-core package which will install a minimal Gnome applications environment to start with. Or install a complete Gnome applications environment (which includes all of gnome-core) by installing the package gnome. Or finally simply install a few goodies (a subselection of gnome) that is tailored to your needs. Here is a list of goodies that I installed (from Universe Repos):

$ sudo apt install eog-plugins gnome-{backgrounds,boxes,clocks,color-manager} \
  gnome-{dictionary,documents,maps,packagekit,shell-extension-weather} \
  gnome-{system-tools,weather,music,photos} gnote

And a few others from the main repos:

$ sudo apt install gnome-user-share indicator-printers

And with this, you can get a nice Gnome environment with a Ubuntu based OS.

For Ubuntu 14.10 Users

The above instructions works also for Ubuntu 14.10 users.